Website Development Process, part 1

Website Development Process

Website Development is a process for creating a new website or implementing changes to one already in use, e.g. adding a significant new section to a live site.
In simple terms, the process represents a framework within which all activities—from inception to review (and eventual demise, if necessary)—can take place. There are 8 steps in the development process. These are:

  • Planning: Decide why you want a website and what to create.
  • Content: Create a list of the content you want.
  • Design: Create a design for displaying the content.
  • Construction: Write the code and load up your content.
  • Test: Make sure everything works properly.
  • Hosting: Choose a domain name & find a place to put your site on the internet.
  • Publicity: Build traffic via publicity the site.
  • Review: Review the site at intervals it to make sure it succeeds.

Of course, Website Development does not happen just for fun—it must be initiated in some way.

The website development process takes place within the bounds of Business Goals and User Needs. It is these that initiate and guide the course of planning, design, content, etc. Until you explore your goals and users, your website simply has no reason to exist.

As such, the first step for creating your website is to decide why you want it and who you are making it for.

Before You Begin Website Development

Although Website Development encompasses a set of quite specialist activities, the processes that underlie it are the same as for any other project.

For example, it needs a team to carry out the work, a timescale to operate within and a set of resources to sustain it. As such, when before starting work the following basic elements must be accounted for:

  • Project objective, e.g. a new website, a new section of content, a new online application.
  • Project team, i.e. a project leader, a content producer, a designer, a coder & any other specialist skills.
  • Budget.
  • Timeframe.
  • Analysis of project risks, dependencies and assumptions, e.g. what could go wrong? What contingencies are in place, etc.
  • A system for project management & communication, e.g. weekly meetings, email, etc.

Source: The Website Manager’s Handbook by Shane Diffily

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